Posted in Fridays are For Illustrations

Sermon Illustration: That’s Not Good!

To set up a sermon on the bizarre reality of God’s declaration that it was not good for man to be alone (Genesis 2:18), I shared how we usually use the phrase. When I say, “that’s not good,” I mean something is messed up. Something has gone wrong. Something is out of place. Something needs to be fixed. When I hear squeaking from under my car when I push on the brakes, I say “that’s not good.” When I see a water leak from my ceiling, I say “that’s not good.” When I am late to a meeting and see blue...

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Sermon Illustration: The Expositional Opening to a Topical Sermon

Last week, we began a topical sermon series on healthy relationships. I try to be as expositional as possible in my preaching, so topical sermons – though necessary – can be an added challenge. The difficulty for me is explaining the point of the Bible book when I know I am not going to be in the same book the following week(s). There is no need to spend tons of time explaining the books purpose. But if the preacher isn’t careful, the context where the verses are found can ignored. This, of course, can be very dangerous. So, the challenge...

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Sermon Illustration: Using the Bible to Illustrate the Bible

Often the preacher doesn’t have to go very far to find an illustration for his sermon. In fact, he may not even have to leave his seat. Many times, the illustration he needs is right under his nose, in the same book he is studying. At the end of John’s Gospel (John 21:20-23), Peter seeks to compare himself to John. He wants to know what life will look like for the “beloved disciple” (John). In other words, he wants to compare what Jesus said about Peter (John 21: 18-19) to what is going to happen to John. Jesus, of course, doesn’t...

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Sermon Illustration: When a Quote Saves the Day

To begin a sermon from John 21:18-19, I confessed my struggle with the text the previous week…   There are some weeks when I am preparing a sermon where the thought for the sermon and direction I feel the text is going comes easily. Like a hot knife through butter. There are other weeks when I wrestle and toss and turn and think and process and read and read and read and nothing seems to come. Like a hot knife through stone. This has been one of those weeks. A hot knife through stone weeks. It’s one thing to know the essence of...

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Sermon Illustration: The Most Important Question

To begin a sermon on the conversation between Peter and Jesus in John 21, I started off describing an earlier conversation between these two from Matthew 16… Matthew records for us in the 16th chapter of his book a critical question Jesus poses to His disciples. First, He asks them, “Who are people saying that I am?” They give Jesus some answers. Some were saying Jesus was like Elijah and Isaiah. Some were even saying Jesus was John the Baptist returned from the dead. Then He asks them this question: “Who do YOU say that I am?” I imagine Him looking...

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Sermon Illustration: Facebook and the Awkward Leak

In a recent sermon from John 21, I wanted to set up a situation to get my hearers thinking about being “caught” in an awkward situation. Being that Facebook has been in the news a lot, I decided picked on this social media giant. Here was my approach… For once in my life, I am glad I’m not Mark Zuckerberg. The head honcho at Facebook is going to have to answer some serious questions before congress about leaked information. Not only was it determined that millions of Facebook users’ private information leaked in 2014; we now know that Facebook leaders knew about it and decided to stay...

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Sermon Illustration: Annual Physical & Easter Sunday

I would love to hear how some of you preachers started out your Easter sermon this year. To set up a sermon on Peace from John 20, here’s the route I chose… I was blessed this week to have an annual physical with my physician in Nashville. It was so much fun. Apart from having tremendous eyesight and perfect bloodwork, for which I am grateful, there are a couple of things he brought to my attention. First, I have put on some pounds since last year. When I got on the scales, I thought they were playing an early April Fool’s joke...

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Sermon Illustration: Preacher, Please Don’t Do This

Preacher, this Sunday is April 1st. This Sunday is also Easter Sunday. That’s right – Easter Sunday is on April Fool’s Day. For those of you who know me, you know I am ALL about using anything to get people’s attention. Even at the risk of being cheesy. Sometimes way too cheesy. So maybe this is a warning to myself as much as it is to any preacher who reads this. If you are anything like me, you will be tempted to start the sermon with a quip about how Jesus’ bones have been found; or that it was determined recently...

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Sermon Illustration: What Would YOU Do?

In an effort to explain God’s harsh treatment of the Egyptians in Exodus 7-10, I asked several questions.  On the surface, it seems like the Father is being remarkably ruthless. Sure, the Egyptians deserved it. Yes, Pharoah continued to harden his heart time and time again. But why did God proceed to pummel the Egyptians over and over and over again? Reading these chapters in Exodus is like watching a fight where the stronger one refuses to relent or let up. Using the following questions as illustrations, here was my best shot to explain: Have you ever walked by a bird’s...

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Sermon Illustration: Talking to Yourself

Recently, I began a sermon by pointing out that our salvation is not based on our feelings. God’s love for His children is not determined by how we are feeling at the moment. Hallelujah. However, what we say to ourselves about ourselves is critical to our well-being. So, to set up a sermon challenging the congregation to not be like the Hebrews and Moses in Exodus 6 (see verse 9), I gave two very captivating quotes. First, from Paul Tripp: No one is more influential in your life than you are, because no one talks to you as much as you talk...

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